showing my daughter
how to cartwheel
Indian Summer


5 Responses

  1. Helen Buckingham Says:

    summer
    a cartwheel
    I could never do

    (bottle rockets)

  2. Jeanne Says:

    Love this! I'm hoping to experience Indian Summer showing my granddaughters how to cartwheel.

  3. seaviewwarrenpoint Says:

    Sounds like such exuberance is unexpected – lovely!

    marion

  4. Alan Summers Says:

    .

    showing my daughter
    how to cartwheel
    Indian Summer

    —VANESSA PROCTOR

    So important, that parents initiate their children into innocent physical activities. Cartwheeling, not so easy for some of us, and a great skill to be appreciated into later life too. Perhaps she may become an astronaut as she is already a G-force girl. :-)
    .
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    Interestingly the Met Office of the U.K. says this about the phrase: INDIAN SUMMER

    Where does the phrase come from?

    "The exact origins of the phrase are uncertain, several writers have speculated it may originally have referred to a spell of warm, hazy autumn conditions that allowed Native American Indians to continue hunting.

    Whatever the origin of the phrase, it evidently first was used in the eastern United States. The first recorded use of the phrase appears in a letter written by a Frenchman called John de Crevecoeur dated 17 January 1778. In his description of the Mohawk country he writes "Sometimes the rain is followed by an interval of calm and warm which is called the Indian summer."

    The term was first used in the UK in the early 19th century and went on to gain widespread usage. The concept of a warm autumn spell though was not new to the UK. Previously, variations of "Saint Martin's summer" were widely used across Europe to describe warm weather surrounding St Martin's Day (11 November)."
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  5. Starr Says:

    Frankly I think that’s abuolstely good stuff.

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