winter ridgeline
a long drawn-out conversation
with wind


6 Responses

  1. Alan Summers Says:

    .
    .
    winter ridgeline
    a long drawn-out conversation
    with wind

    —MARK DAILEY
    .
    Just the context setting opening line speaks of tension and resonance. We have a subtle shape poem aspect with the long (for obvious reasons) middle line.

    Wonderfully atmosphere, I almost feel I am there, eating wind, and "talking wind", and attempting conversations!

    .
    .

    midnight wind picks up the looking glass

    Alan Summers
    original version published:
    Otoliths issue forty-four, part one ed. Mark Young
    (May 2017) ISSN: 1833-6221
    From “Not when she’s in Kansas” haiku sequence/haibun hybrid
    .
    .

  2. Mike Schoenburg I Says:

    Like your winter poem!

    summer sky
    pillows on blue
    along the long trail~~~

  3. janewilliams Says:

    Reading this – a sensory experience, loved it …

    wind tunnel the buildings swap tall tales

  4. aniketnikhade Says:

    Best part of the winter poem is the element of "stretch", how it's use. The way it works as it works very well and of course there is a lot of depth in the way of telling things. The term "drawn-out" refers to giving emphasis to certain aspect of a conversation. Those are the important aspects of conversation. Absolutely interesting.

  5. daileym Says:

    Thanks to all for the kind and interesting feedback–And thanks to Jane, Alan, and MIke for sharing little poems from the same thematic grab-bag!

  6. Ellen Grace Olinger Says:

    Excellent poem

Leave a Reply