an old house
near the cemetery
wild flowers 


—Martin Gottlieb Cohen
        

First published in Tina Stanton's "Moments".

About the author: Martin Cohen was born in the South Bronx somewhere on Simpson Street, went to a Yeshiva on East Broadway and Canal Street, and then lived in the South of Brooklyn, the South of Long Island, The Southern Tier of Upstate New York, The South of Manhattan, and finally South Jersey in Egg Harbor.

Martin's e-mail address: martin1223 at comcast dot net

Martin also has a weblog.

 

Responses to the haiku for 21 May 2003 by Martin Gottlieb Cohen

  1.  
    Ellen G. Olinger (ElinGrace at wi dot rr dot com)
    2003-05-21 15:02:01
     

    Lovely. I wouldn't change a thing! Many wildflowers and fields here, with tiny cemeteries that are lovingly maintained.

    old photos
    on my desk--
    bleeding hearts in bloom

    (TIME OF SINGING, A Magazine of Christian Poetry,1994)

    www.timeofsinging.bizland.com

  2.  
    2003-05-21 20:14:07
     

    The theme of time is present in each line; in the last, I read the wild flowers as feral garden flowers from the old house.
    My only question concerns the preposition: why 'near'? - it seems vague and out of place among the clarities of the rest of the haiku. Perhaps it helps create the renga-like ambiguity whereby the middle line could either complete the sentence begun in the 1st line, or begin a new sentence ending with the final line.
    A warm tranquil haiku.

    Contact

  3.  
    bob richardson (orgbob at webv dot net)
    2003-05-23 20:33:09
     

    norman, try reading the piece without "near" being a part of it.

    "near" creates the transition from the first line to the second line.

    i must say i had to rethink your usage of "clarity" and "vague".

    isn't there, and using your words(norman), a renga-like ambiguity whereby the middle line could either complete the sentence begun in the 1st line, or begin a new sentence ending with the final line in many a haiku.

    now, if i could only figure out why ellen's presented the haiku, taken from "time of singing",
    for comparison?

    by the way, martin, i liked this piece, simply for it's brevity and the visions it conjured up. it seemed to encompass the fullness of life and death, showing how death is always with us, merely to be replenish by life again; seemingly a never ending cycle.

    old, decrepit, life ending, yet life still flourishes, wild and free, the way life was meant to be.

  4.  
    Ellen G. Olinger (ElinGrace at wi dot rr dot com)
    2003-05-24 07:25:33
     

    Hi Bob,

    The tinywords World Poetry Day event on 3/21 inspired me to go through my work and begin sending more out again. A really good feeling.

    I connected this old poem from Time of Singing with Martin's "old photo" on 3/13. I had been thinking of sending it to him, and then it seemed to fit with his poem today as well.

    We have bleeding hearts in our back yard. I remember the moment of my poem well. "Old photos" of dear relatives when they were younger, who are gone now. And I drive by the country cemeteries often, as I rarely take the freeways anymore. My last teaching position was in Chicago, so the contrast of city and country is very vivid for me. The country is deeper now.

    Best wishes, Ellen

  5.  
    bob richardson (orgbob at webtv dot net)
    2003-06-09 13:53:10
     

    ellen, truly the author's additional words are the icing on the cake.
    it is one thing to allow the words to form one's first opinion, but i marvel when the writer takes the time to provide additional insight.
    if only this was the case in all viewings, how delightful it would be.

    thank you



    ps: keep writing, i feel within you exist a wealth of talent.

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