hiddenemyself

—Martin Mikelberg
        

this is one of my first minimal haiku - the Zen thought is there and it utilizes as few words as possible (and the common letters are omitted)

first published in Modern Haiku - 1994

About the author: Martin Mikelberg (onewe at aeitv.net) is a retired CPA, who worked for CW Industries as their V.P. of Finance before retiring after 31 years of employment. His hobbies include music (pennywhistles and harmonica), swimming, walking, writing haiku poetry, and collecting paperweights and glass whimseys. He has just been appointed International Treasurer of Questers, a group whose interests include the preservation and restoration of historic sites as well as an antique studies. He lives in Roslyn, PA.

 

Responses to the haiku for 3 June 2006 by Martin Mikelberg

  1.  
    2006-06-03 09:45:43
     

    I enjoyed your haiku even more than Cor's "tundra" (-;

    I can see that you would need "hidden" rather than "hide" to make it work so well.

    It must have been a joy to have the great Bob Spiess accept your work, and I bet he sent you a nice note too.

    Thank you, and look forward to seeing more of your work.

  2.  
    Angelika Wienert
    2006-06-03 10:07:48
     

    what means this e between hidden and myself?

  3.  
    Georgia
    2006-06-03 10:22:35
     

    Really clever. I love the "nesting" of the words inside one another. Or I might call it "nestling"!

    Thanks!

  4.  
    Bill Kenney
    2006-06-03 11:12:41
     

    More than clever, Martin.

  5.  
    Fran Morris
    2006-06-03 11:22:34
     

    Minimal haiku
    Maximal genius

  6.  
    Frances Ruth Harris
    2006-06-03 13:30:03
     

    Yes! Thank you! More! More! More!

  7.  
    Vasile Moldovan (vasilemoldovan at yahoo dot com)
    2006-06-03 14:23:38
     

    It is interesting. In my country there is the poem into one line. Since 1936. However, it has a caesura, like this reply for the Martin's text:

    Flower out of sight: soul of woman

  8.  
    Fran Morris
    2006-06-03 16:02:44
     

    HighIQ
    Haiku

  9.  
    prado chekov
    2006-06-03 16:18:15
     

    reminds me of the old concentration gameshow.
    to really learn this craft, find a newspaper
    game called "say what you see." clever?
    perhaps. genius? no. there is nothing new
    about this type of approach.

    doggodpeeseepsonnobob
    innitheehtmirrorrorrim

  10.  
    Georgia
    2006-06-04 07:54:55
     

    In my enthusiasm about the minimal form (new to me), I neglected to mention, in my first response, the artistry & insight of "hiddenemyself" -- admirable!

  11.  
    Vasile Moldovan (vasilemoldovan at yahoo dot com)
    2006-06-04 08:10:56
     

    Nothing whatsoever
    about this pseudo-haiku...
    Poetic song or silence?

  12.  
    felice and bob
    2006-06-04 15:30:17
     

    Dad,

    You make us proud!

    oneweloveu

  13.  
    jerel
    2006-06-05 11:01:03
     

    Wonderful! I think this transcends the haiku form into what should be called Sudden Haiku.

    (I hate to do this, but someone really should, in case others don't get it. Explaining it doesn't really ruin it if you don't get it in the first place. The art of this poem is that it is crafted from three words: "hidden enemy myself")

  14.  
    b. m. richardson (orgbob at webtv dot net)
    2006-06-06 19:53:27
     

    in reading an elizabeth st jacques' article,
    i again encountered basho's much read
    "old pond
    a frog leaps in
    water's sound"
    does it get any better than this

    elizabeth presents a piece by emily romano's,
    "hibiscushionswallowtail"

    can't you feel the moment; and acceptable haiku definitives

    martin, rather mystical; but something seems lost


    humidawnecksaffronstigma...

  15.  
    Anthony Slauson
    2006-06-07 05:42:49
     

    This is closer to a jigsawpuzzle than it is a haiku.. i did enjoy it though :)(:

  16.  
    2006-06-08 08:23:13
     

    Thanks jerel for answering Angelika's question.

    In response to some of the questions, I can highly recommend:

    The Nick of Time:
    Essays on Haiku Aesthetics
    by Paul O. Williams
    Press Here, 2001. ISBN 1-878798-23-5

    Further details at:
    http://www.haikuworld.org/books/nickoftime.html

  17.  
    b.m.r.
    2009-06-16 17:51:15
     

    existigmartyrannympholepsylph...

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