temple gate:
the wind gets in faster
than the devotees


—Kala Ramesh
        

From India - the land of Temples.

About the author: Kala Ramesh is a performing vocalist in Indian Classical music. Coming from an extremely artistic and culturally rich South Indian family, Kala believes -- as her father is fond of saying -- that "the soil has to be fertile for the plant to bloom" and feels that she owes this poetic streak in her to her mother. A proud mother of two young adults, Kala lives with her husband in Pune, India.

Responses to the haiku for 30 August 2006 by Kala Ramesh

  1.  
    Andrea (andrea dot cecon at gmail dot com)
    2006-08-30 01:26:34
     

    Your ku is splendid, Kala... This one was born during a trip in Ladakh:

    temple drums
    small children play
    with a bottle

  2.  
    Magyar
    2006-08-30 06:39:57
     

    Kala,
    _You've brought to mind:

    things of nature
    never wait
    with their disciples

    _ Kala, again your words are prized.
    tnx, -M

  3.  
    Angelika Wienert
    2006-08-30 07:11:35
     

    that`s a good haiku!

  4.  
    b. m. richardson (orgbob at webtv dot net)
    2006-08-30 07:37:35
     

    dawn:
    steady downpour
    fails to dampen my day

  5.  
    Bill Kenney
    2006-08-30 08:18:22
     

    First Confession—
    a nun hurries children
    past the garden

  6.  
    Vasile Moldovan
    2006-08-30 12:25:52
     

    Temple's bells-
    the wind carries on its wings
    their echo

  7.  
    Ed Schwellenbach
    2006-08-30 17:48:28
     

    angelus bells ...
    this wind puts their call
    in my face

  8.  
    2006-08-31 03:25:31
     

    Excellent, absolutely adore the haiku!

  9.  
    Vidur Jyoti
    2006-08-31 06:15:16
     

    temple bells:
    child jumps to reach
    echoes slip away

  10.  
    Georgia Kornbluth
    2006-08-31 10:02:31
     

    Imaginative, evocative. It grows on me. Fine haiku.

  11.  
    kala ramesh
    2006-09-05 00:30:35
     

    Dear haiku lovers,

    Thanks a ton!
    I greatly enjoyed reading the comments and your resonant haiku
    - warmly,
    kala

  12.  
    b. m. richardson (orgbob at webtv dot net)
    2006-09-05 05:02:26
     

    good morning kala,
    funny how my mind works; i was going to say strange. lol
    from your acknowledge this came to mind, this rainy morn:



    thanks, a bunch
    of yellow-rayed sunflowers

  13.  
    kala ramesh
    2006-09-05 20:05:08
     

    Good morning Bob,

    How are you?
    Ha! your response provoked this one below-
    like you've noted life is about resonating but it can also be all about merging?

    black butterfly. . .
    caught within the house
    becomes one with night

  14.  
    b. m. richardson (orgbob at webtv dot net)
    2006-09-07 12:16:05
     

    kala, your words caused me to pause these past few days.
    resonating, merging, so true and yet aren't both these terms going hand-in-hand in life; i ponder, might i say through life...
    but at first glance they seem to oppose.
    then, there's my perceiving freedom in life.


    ...stream free flowing
    blossoming trees
    this day i bow to thee

    (Vande Mataram)

  15.  
    kala ramesh
    2006-09-07 18:37:15
     

    Bob,

    Of course - You are right!

    Resonance and merger are like the waxing and the waning of the moon. . . which is life itself!

    Just out of curiosity - How much about India do you know?
    I remember you had quoted a Sanskrit verse once and now its Vande Mataram!!
    I'm truly impressed.

    - warmly,
    kala

  16.  
    b. m. richardson (orgbob at webtv dot net)
    2006-09-08 21:51:01
     

    kala, i can't quantify my knowledge; look toward the stars, while remembering tadpoles in spring. who knows their exact number, but i'm sure one does exist

    -

    cold winds cross
    the brahmaputra
    the lauhitya, warm my heart

    -

    this gurgling sound-
    my bhullam-buthur

    ---

    the more one learns, the more one realizes there is to learn. these days, i dream of ignorance's bliss.

  17.  
    kala ramesh
    2006-09-09 18:27:22
     

    Bob, I agree with you here-
    A beautiful proverb in Tamil:

    what is learnt
    is a handful of sand
    what is not learnt
    is as big as the world


    Please note the use of sand - mud stays in the hand but sand slips off through the fingers, leaving very little behind?



    You write
    "these days, i dream of ignorance's bliss"

    through mud roads
    a jostling bus ride. . .
    smell of sweat

  18.  
    b. m. richardson (orgbob at webtv dot net)
    2006-09-10 06:15:45
     

    "verumkai enbathu moodathanam, un viralgal pathum mooladhanam"
    there is nothing called empty hands. you always have 10 fingers in it

    ---

    kala,
    muddy roads i've followed, jostling buses ridden, smelled sweat to rivalled a rose, traversed decades; given time we learn, over the course of time, time shows it being a timely loan.

    -

    mantra, chanting
    cross green paddy...
    my deliverance

  19.  
    kala ramesh
    2006-09-10 17:53:44
     

    Bob,

    I am clean bowled . . .
    Your tamil quote is beautiful

    Coming back to hands even Buddha had said something like - I might have given you only a handful of knowledge but that is the essence. . .

    I am truly impressed with you Bob!
    -warmly,
    kala

  20.  
    Guha Krishnaswamy
    2006-09-13 06:02:50
     

    Temple gate
    Wind just slides in
    While humans always compete

  21.  
    b.m.r.
    2009-09-22 15:32:26
     

    butterfly, without colour
    this autumn dawn
    the leaves are turning

  22.