the slit
in a cicada’s husk
hospice garden


6 Responses

  1. Mike Schoenburg Says:

    That’s sad~~~

    tulips in the garden
    tulips in the park
    two lips I like best are
    two lips in the dark

  2. Mary Kendall Says:

    What a beautiful written and crafted haiku . . . the way you set off the first line ("the slit") by itself is perfect. It is such a loaded word and also such a simple, unadorned visual. The endings at hospice and the ending of the cicada's cocooning as it emerges into its true life form. After having been to hospice when my mother-in-law was there prior to her passing, I can feel the sadness, the wonder and the miracle of death and crossing over in your poem. Beautifully done.

  3. magyar Says:

    Agnes, your heartful haiku, and my echoed "copy" of your verse, may in themselves… juxtapose.
    __ Some that read this, my "copied echo," may sense this as an insult to your fine haiku, 'tis not. I simply think that all things of life's "time," meet, at the same final point. Memories remain. _m

    the gap
    of this rust filled hull
    dry-dock end

  4. Jo Balistreri Says:

    Agnes, what a beautiful haiku, poignant and very touching. I agree with Mary, that simple word, silt—so loaded, so simple…
    Thank you.

  5. Jeff hoagland Says:

    Agnes, Agnes, my favorite Texan – I love this. I have always recognized the human-like quality of cicadas, with their big eyes, their song of love, and their sorrowful impermanence ( the husk, and the quietude after summer). Great resonance!

  6. Alan Summers Says:

    the slit
    in a cicada’s husk
    hospice garden

    —AGNES EVA SAVICH

    Brilliant use of one image against another image, in a powerful manner, and utilising Greek myth, for instance.

    The use of silt, cicada, husk, and hospice, and juxtaposed against garden. A garden is a place of death as much as it is about life, just as the other words have their cycle of these dynamics.

    Terrific poem!
    .
    .

    sick train the night heron shifts silt for all of us

    Alan Summers
    Publication credits: a handful of stones (2nd March 2011)
    Anthology: A Blackbird Sings, a small stone anthology ISBN 978-0-9571584-2-9 ed. Fiona Robyn & Kaspalita Thompson (Woodsmoke Press 2012)

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