an old friend
without a name
fallen leaves

 


8 Responses

  1. Dirk van Nouhuys Says:

    Movingly mysterious.

  2. Pravat Says:

    A beautiful haiku with a brilliant juxtaposition.

    displaced people
    the falling leaves
    trapped in a storm

    Pravat Kumar Padhy
    Publication Credit: Lakeview International Journal of Literature and Arts, Vol.1 No.2 August 2013

    *****
    fallen leaves–
    the beggar loses
    his address

    Pravat Kumar Padhy
    Publication Credit: Whispers, Dec 2016

  3. Alan Summers Says:

    Still love all the haiku that I accepted from you for my Special Feature, Lakeview International Journal of Literature and Arts, Vol.1 No.2 August 2013. :-)

    Including:

    sound of a beetle
    the window filters
    its anxiety

    I love how the middle line, not even just as a hinge line, gives extra meaning and layers by the use of its line break enjambments.

    warm regards,
    Alan

  4. Pravat Says:

    Thank you, Alan, for referring my haiku,' sound of a beetle'. I feel humbled for the inclusion of the poem in the haiku section of the prestigious issue of " Lakeview Int. Jour. of Lit. and Arts", edited by you. It is an honour for me.

    Warm regards
    Pravat

  5. Mike Schoenburg Says:

    Beautiful imagery!

    bright colors
    a celebration of
    the dying leaves 🍁🍂

  6. Alan Summers Says:

    .
    an old friend
    without a name
    fallen leaves

    —MARION ALICE POIRIER

    I've greatly enjoyed and appreciated getting my own interpretations out of your haiku.

    "an old friend without a name" is an intriguing phrase and even moreso coupled with "fallen leaves"

    This could be about a human friend who has fallen on very hard times or even died in a wartime conflict.
    Or it could be about a family home tree loved through the process of child to adult to older generation.

    Often using 'old' is a cliché, a quick shortcut or shorthand, but not so here. In fact, it's vital and gives the haiku its body and heart.

    Two from me, one using old and one using fallen leaves. The other one I have is not yet published but it's where I use fallen leaves as a metaphor for the people who died in wars.
    .
    .

    old tales
    moon-bright leaves
    jostle the breeze
     
    Alan Summers
    Wild Plum 1:1 (Spring & Summer 2015)
    .
    .
    and
    .
    .
    we shift and turn 
    the migrating clocks 
    fallen leaves 

    Alan Summers
    Issue 107:
    low sky
    winter haiku 2017
    Guest Editor Eric Burke

  7. Magyar Says:

    Fallen leaves, so well seen as you have written Marion_!
    __ 'Tis wise to learn from the past; the sounds of fallen leaves, a history.

    the teachers
    along yesterday's pathway
    fallen leaves

  8. kalaramesh Says:

    Lovely ku, Marion.

    As Alan and Pravat discuss about Lakeview International Journal of Literature and Arts, Vol.1 No.2 August 2013. :-)
    I remember my ku, Alan picked up for that issue around your theme, Marion!!

    falling leaves . . .
    if only sorrow could be
    contained in a palm

    _()_.

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