afternoon sun
an oarsman breaks
another cloud

 

 

 

(Originally in A Haze of Infinity, the London haiku group anthology, 2017)


16 Responses

  1. Peggy Bilbro Says:

    Beautiful image!

  2. Peggy Bilbro Says:

    I mean beautiful image in your poem.

  3. Robert Kingston Says:

    Thank you Peggy.

  4. Alan Summers Says:

    .
    afternoon sun
    an oarsman breaks
    another cloud

    —ROBERT KINGSTON
    (Originally in A Haze of Infinity, the London haiku group anthology, 2017)

    Great sense of movement which can really lift a haiku, which can be too often a static and silent image if we are not careful.

    I like the subtle humour which the term haiku suggests (hai=playful ku=verse).

    Very neatly crafted haiku that is a joy to read many times.

    warm regards,

    Alan

  5. Robert Kingston Says:

    Thank you Alan for your kind words and insight.
    Crazy to think I’ve been writing haiku for several years not knowing the translation.
    Warm regards
    Rob

  6. Alan Summers Says:

    It used to be quoted more often, although it doesn't mean that haiku should be a blunt joke as we see so often.

    .

    afternoon sun
    an oarsman breaks
    another cloud

    —ROBERT KINGSTON
    (Originally in A Haze of Infinity, the London haiku group anthology, 2017)

    .

    autumn twilight . . .
    swan shapes separate
    for the lone boatman

    Alan Summers
    Anthology: City: Bristol Today in Poems and Pictures (Paralalia 2004)
    Honored to have had my haiku in an anthology that featured work by the late and great Helen Dunmore (poet, novelist, and short story and children's writer) who worked in an office off Bristol's Park Street, my hometown.

    I'm not always a fan of the rowing boats, as I like rivers to be owned by swans, ducks, and kingfishers, but sometimes they lend themselves to a haiku. :-)

    Alan

  7. Robert Kingston Says:

    autumn twilight . . .
    swan shapes separate
    for the lone boatman

    Alan Summers
    Anthology: City: Bristol Today in Poems and Pictures (Paralalia 2004)

    Love the images and alliteration in your ku Alan.

    Best regards
    Rob

  8. Alan Summers Says:

    When I lived in Bristol, and forgotten there was alliteration, but yes, it seems to do the job! :-) It was great to be challenged to do a whole series of haiku around and about Bristol. :-)

    Alan

  9. Robert Kingston Says:

    I went into Bristol once when young. A place that I would like to go again. I’ve watched documentaries showing the vast array of graffiti art that I’d like to see up close. Also it being named Britain’s cultural city a few years ago I believe would be a good place to spend a weekend.

  10. Alan Summers Says:

    Bristol is now safe to enter, but not through the years of 1970s to late 1990s. Yes, there are big sections of the town set aside for graffiti, and of course we had Banksy when it seemed the city council and police were against everyone.

    Yep, a lot to see, and the harbourside keeps being spruced up. If you get as far as Park Street, the Boston Tea Party was where I met Karen for the very first time, at a regular writers' group upstairs! :-)

    Alan

  11. Adjei Agyei-Baah Says:

    I can hear the roar…i can hear the crack. A great image captured with a touch of eclat!

  12. Robert Kingston Says:

    Thank you Adjei Agyer-Basho.

  13. magyar Says:

    Robert, thanks for your nifty thought… and that thought has "paddled" this echo.
    __ Oarlocks squeak; oars create "water cyclones" that spin these sun reflective shadows. _m

    oars squeak
    to swirl these day cloud shadows
    cyclones

  14. Robert Kingston Says:

    Thank you Magyar.
    Pleased my ku inspired your lovely response.

    Warm regards
    Robert

  15. Seren Fargo Says:

    A really nice twist on the reflection theme.

  16. Robert Kingston Says:

    Thank you Seren Fargo.

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